Edge of Nowhere

[vc_row fullwidth=”true” attached=”false” padding=”0″][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_page_title_box page_title=”Edge of Nowhere” page_subtitle=”GREATSTONE AND DUNGENESS” section_height=”600″ bg_type=”image” bg_image=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/greatstone-new-1.jpg” bg_position=”center bottom” bg_stretch=”true” bg_effects=”parallax” attachment=”scroll” text_align=”center” font_size=”58″ title_letter_spacing=”3″ font_color=”#ffffff” font_weight=”300″ underline=”false” padding=”13″ sub_font_size=”20″ sub_font_color=”#ffffff” sub_font_weight=”bold”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row fullwidth=”false” attached=”false” padding=”5″][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”40″]

Back in the 80s, my parents would take me on holiday to a caravan park in Greatstone.  In 2011, some 25 years later, I went back there with my Nikon D40 to see how it had changed

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]As holiday destinations go, Greatstone had an odd sense of melancholy about it. I don’t ever remember the place being particularly lively. Nor do I remember ever experiencing nice weather while staying there.

Having said that, I have some fond childhood memories of the place.

It was where I first learnt how to swim and I vividly remember that there was a red tricycle in the local bike shop, that I’d badger my family to rent, and if any other child had it that day, I’d throw a tantrum.

If it was raining, we’d stay in and watch Robin Hood on the TV.

If the weather was ok, I’d go to the park’s playground and play on the tyre ride.

And there was pebbles, lots and lots of pebbles, everywhere.  Separated only by concrete footpaths.[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/caravan-park-greatstone.jpg” image_width=”1323″ image_height=”350″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” desc=”La Rocco appartments” caption_location=”outside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”40″ el_class=”FeatureFullWidth”][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Across the road to the caravan park is Greatstone Beach.  A location that has barely changed at all in the 25 years since I’ve been there.

Vast, sandy and stretching as far as the eye can see, in the distance you can see the white cliffs of Dover.  And in the opposite direction, the power station in Dungeness looms over the landscape.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row fullwidth=”true” attached=”false” padding=”0″][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_page_title_box section_height=”575″ bg_type=”image” bg_image=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Photo-17-04-2015-00-07-00.jpg” bg_position=”center center” bg_stretch=”true” attachment=”scroll” text_align=”center” font_size=”50″ title_letter_spacing=”3″ font_color=”#ffffff” font_weight=”300″ underline=”false” padding=”18″ sub_font_size=”17″ sub_font_color=”#ffffff” sub_font_weight=”normal”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Scattered around the coastline, there still remains the odd bit of random clutter left from what I am guessing is a previous fishing industry, rusty items that further compliment the area’s peculiar atmosphere.[/vc_column_text][mk_gallery images=”7178,7179″ style=”grid” column=”2″ image_size=”full” height=”500″ hover_scenarios=”fadebox” item_spacing=”8″ margin_bottom=”20″ frame_style=”simple” disable_title=”false” image_quality=”1″ pagination=”false” count=”10″ pagination_style=”1″ order=”ASC” orderby=”rand” item_id=”1429527959-5534dd97aa6c5″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]One of the main attractions was the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, that ran adjacent and would stop at the caravan park, allowing the happy campers to head either to New Romney or Dungeness.  A network that remains there to this day.[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/greatstone-train.jpg” image_width=”1323″ image_height=”350″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” desc=”The Romney Hythe and Dymchurch Railway (taken in Dungness)” caption_location=”outside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”40″ el_class=”FeatureFullWidth”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row fullwidth=”true” attached=”false” padding=”0″][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_page_title_box section_height=”300″ bg_type=”image” bg_image=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/dungeness-new-2.jpg” bg_position=”center center” bg_stretch=”true” attachment=”scroll” text_align=”center” font_size=”50″ title_letter_spacing=”3″ font_color=”#ffffff” font_weight=”300″ underline=”false” padding=”18″ sub_font_size=”17″ sub_font_color=”#ffffff” sub_font_weight=”normal” page_title=”Dungeness” page_subtitle=”A barren looking, desolate location, yet utterly unique and bizarrely beautiful”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Dungeness has hardly changed over the years and the area remains exactly how I remembered it.

From the crumbling sheds to the rusting machinery and all the various bits and pieces of flotsam and jetsam, everything is still there.[/vc_column_text][mk_gallery images=”7183,7184,7185,7186,7187″ style=”style3″ column=”1″ image_size=”crop” height=”500″ hover_scenarios=”fadebox” item_spacing=”8″ margin_bottom=”20″ frame_style=”simple” disable_title=”false” image_quality=”1″ pagination=”false” count=”10″ pagination_style=”1″ order=”ASC” orderby=”rand” item_id=”1429527959-5534dd97aa6c5″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]The only modern structures that can be seen is the power station and the hundreds of pylons scattered across the landscape, heading inland.[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/dungeness-landscape-1.jpg” image_width=”1364″ image_height=”589″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” desc=”Dungeness” caption_location=”outside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”10″][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row fullwidth=”true” attached=”false” padding=”0″][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_page_title_box section_height=”700″ bg_type=”image” bg_image=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/sound-mirrors-new-4.jpg” bg_position=”center center” bg_stretch=”true” attachment=”scroll” text_align=”center” font_size=”50″ title_letter_spacing=”3″ font_color=”#ffffff” font_weight=”300″ underline=”false” padding=”18″ sub_font_size=”17″ sub_font_color=”#ffffff” sub_font_weight=”normal” page_title=”Echoes from the past” page_subtitle=”GREATSTONES CONCRETE RELICS”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]

Further in from the coast at Greatstone, the monolithic sound mirrors can be found, sitting on an island within a lake in the former RAF complex, commonly known as Denge.

[/vc_column_text][mk_gallery images=”7209,7211,7213,7215,7216″ style=”style3″ column=”1″ image_size=”crop” height=”500″ hover_scenarios=”fadebox” item_spacing=”8″ margin_bottom=”20″ frame_style=”simple” disable_title=”false” image_quality=”1″ pagination=”false” count=”10″ pagination_style=”1″ order=”DESC” orderby=”rand” item_id=”1429527959-5534dd97aa6c5″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]

The concrete relics that ominously overlook the flat landscape of the Dungeness Nature Reserve, were designed to listen out for enemy aircraft.

[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/sound-mirrors-new-2.jpg” image_width=”1250″ image_height=”966″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” desc=”Listening…” caption_location=”outside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”10″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Built around the 1920s – 1930s, there are 3 mirrors in total.

The idea was that these structures would serve as an early warning system that could detect approaching enemy aircraft using a centralised microphone to pinpoint sound waves.

However, their use was limited.

It was difficult to differentiate between aircrafts and the ships out at sea. And as aircraft speed improved, along with the development of radar technology in 1932, the project was abandoned and sound mirrors were left to decay.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row fullwidth=”true” attached=”false” padding=”0″][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_page_title_box section_height=”575″ bg_type=”image” bg_image=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/sound-mirrors-new-wide.jpg” bg_position=”center center” bg_stretch=”true” attachment=”scroll” text_align=”center” font_size=”50″ title_letter_spacing=”3″ font_color=”#ffffff” font_weight=”300″ underline=”false” padding=”18″ sub_font_size=”17″ sub_font_color=”#ffffff” sub_font_weight=”normal”][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]In recent years, much restoration work has been carried out on these structures – preserving them for future generations to see.

Access to the Sound Mirrors is now restricted. However, the Romney Marsh Countryside Project do run open days and various walks through out the year.

For more information about this, hit the link below.[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Romney Marsh Countryside Project” target=”_blank” color=”btn-inverse” icon=”none” size=”wpb_regularsize” href=”http://www.rmcp.co.uk/NoticeBoard.php”][vc_empty_space height=”80px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/6″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][mk_circle_image src=”https://cdmiller.photography/wp-content/uploads/bfi_thumb/cdmiller-photos-m471q6u9ht58ranxouaspvyy4jzulsjoq673lxoc5k.jpg” image_diameter=”500″][vc_empty_space height=”40px”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]

About the author

Edge of Nowhere was written by Colin Miller, a photographer based in south west London.

The photographs presented in this feature were all taken at the following locations:

  • Greatstone
  • Dungeness
  • Greatstone Lakes (AKA Denge)

For more information, view the map below.[/vc_column_text][vc_gmaps link=”#E-8_JTNDaWZyYW1lJTIwc3JjJTNEJTIyaHR0cHMlM0ElMkYlMkZ3d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbSUyRm1hcHMlMkZlbWJlZCUzRnBiJTNEJTIxMW0xNCUyMTFtMTIlMjExbTMlMjExZDQwMjE2LjY5MTE5NzgzNzU4JTIxMmQwLjk3MTk0ODEwNDg5OTgxMjYlMjEzZDUwLjk1MDY2MDQzMDU3ODU0JTIxMm0zJTIxMWYwJTIxMmYwJTIxM2YwJTIxM20yJTIxMWkxMDI0JTIxMmk3NjglMjE0ZjEzLjElMjE1ZTAlMjEzbTIlMjExc2VuJTIxMnN1ayUyMTR2MTQyOTUyNTQwODU5NiUyMiUyMHdpZHRoJTNEJTIyNjAwJTIyJTIwaGVpZ2h0JTNEJTIyNDUwJTIyJTIwZnJhbWVib3JkZXIlM0QlMjIwJTIyJTIwc3R5bGUlM0QlMjJib3JkZXIlM0EwJTIyJTNFJTNDJTJGaWZyYW1lJTNF”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_facebook type=”standard”][vc_tweetmeme type=”horizontal”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”60px”][/vc_column][/vc_row]